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DEFENCE REPORT

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Cyberwarfare Market 2010-2020

Cyberwarfare Market 2010-2020

  • Publication date: 11/01/2010
  • Number of Pages: 150
  1. Report Details
  2. Table of Contents
  3. Companies Listed

Report Details

Our brand new defence report – Cyberwarfare Market 2010-2020 – assesses the considerable business opportunities exhibited by one of the defence industry’s fastest-growing markets. Our market study examines the leading cyber nations and analyses the range of factors that are driving strong global sales growth.

Our analysis has concluded that worldwide spending on cyberwarfare by governments and armed forces in 2009 totalled $8.12bn. We analyse the combination of drivers and restraints that are resulting in increasing sales around the world. We also examine the most promising areas of technological development that are likely to have a profound effect on the cyber security strategy of the US and other leading cyber nations over our forecast period.

We examine the commercial prospects for companies involved in supplying cyber tools and network-security products and services in the cyberwarfare marketplace. This analytical report defines the current state of the cyberwarfare market and discusses its potential for growth from 2010 onwards, with detailed market forecasting carried out at both global and national levels.

Recent events have demonstrated the potential of cyberwarfare and this is driving strong growth in cyber security. Estonia came under cyber attack in 2007 at the time of a political dispute with Russia. The internet sites of Estonian banks, companies, government ministries, newspapers and political parties were targeted by distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks. A year later, Georgian web pages were attacked by civilians as Russia carried out real-world military strikes during the South Ossetia War. During 2009, serious cyber attacks continued to occur, with attacks on the institutions of countries including South Korea and the US.

To what extent are increasingly frequent cyber attacks set to affect network-security budgets in the future? How much do individual countries plan to spend on both strengthening their computer defences and developing offensive cyber weapons for their armed forces? In which regions are the most significant growth opportunities in the cyberwarfare market between 2010 and 2020?

We answer these critical questions and many more with the in-depth analyses presented in this report.

A comprehensive analysis of the cyberwarfare market:

Cyberwarfare Market 2010-2020 examines the global market for cyber-defence measures and offensive cyber capabilities from an impartial standpoint. We offer a review of significant cyberwarfare contracting activity based on our analysis of information obtained from multiple sources.

The report draws on a rich combination of primary research, interviews, official corporate and governmental announcements, media reports, policy documents, industry statements and an extensive gathering of expert opinion.

Cyberwarfare Market 2010-2020 provides detailed sales forecasts for the global market and 12 leading national markets; a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis; discussions of commercial and technological trends; and assessments of market drivers and restraints. This report also includes transcripts of seven in-depth interviews with industry experts. This package of analyses cannot be obtained anywhere else.

Why you should buy Cyberwarfare Market 2010-2020:

The main benefits you can derive from purchasing this report are:
• You will come to understand the current state of the global cyberwarfare market and form a clear vision of how it will develop, based on our market forecasts for 2010 to 2020.
• You will be able to examine our detailed global sales forecasts, as well as national sales forecasts for the 12 leading national cyberwarfare markets.
• You will gain an insight into the cyberwarfare market’s potential for further growth by examining the major commercial drivers and restraints.
• You will learn how the world’s armed forces are researching not only defensive measures but also developing offensive cyberwarfare capabilities.
• You will find out how the leading players in the cyberwarfare market are performing, with details of recent contract awards.
• You will be able to appreciate the wide range of factors affecting market growth with our SWOT analysis of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats.
• You will learn what leading experts think the future holds by reading original interviews from the following seven companies that discuss a wide range of cyberwarfare issues:
- Boeing Integrated Defense Systems (IDS)
- Co-operative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence
- F-Secure Corporation
- Kaspersky Lab
- McAfee Inc
- Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)
- Spirent Communications

The global cyberwarfare market is expected to continue to see significant sales growth in 2010 and beyond. We forecast that armed forces and governments are set to increase spending on securing their critical networks. More governments are anticipated to accelerate plans to develop defensive and offensive cyberwarfare capabilities, as well as establishing centres for co-ordinating cyber responses. We believe the cyber-security boom offers a lucrative range of business opportunities for defence companies and software developers.

You can order this report today. Anyone with an interest in the future procurement of cyber-security tools in the defence sector cannot afford to miss out on acquiring the combination of information and insight that only this new report can provide.

Gain an understanding of how to tap into the huge potential of this exciting market by ordering Cyberwarfare Market 2010-2020.

Visiongain is a trading partner with the US Federal Government
CCR Ref number: KD4R6 

Table of Contents

1. Executive Summary

2. Introduction to Cyberwarfare
2.1 The Threat of Cyberwarfare
2.2 Types of Cyber Attack
2.2.1 Disinformation, Propaganda and Vandalism
2.2.2 Compromised Equipment
2.2.3 Cyber Espionage and Intelligence Gathering
2.2.4 Disruption of Critical Infrastructure
2.2.5 Reconnaissance
2.3 Cyber Weapons
2.3.1 Botnet
2.3.2 Distributed Denial-of-Service
2.3.3 Logic Bomb
2.3.4 Other Malicious Software
2.4 Cyber Defences
2.4.1 Firewalls
2.4.2 Intrusion Detection Systems
2.4.3 Intrusion Prevention Systems
2.4.4 Network Access Controls
2.4.5 Virtual Private Networks
2.4.6 Vulnerability Scanners
2.5 Non-Public Networks
2.6 Notable Cyber Attacks
2.6.1 Estonia 2007
2.6.2 Georgia 2008
2.6.3 Kyrgyzstan 2009
2.6.4 South Korea 2009
2.7 Cyber Espionage: GhostNet
2.8 The Benefits of This Report
2.9 Methods

3. The Global Cyberwarfare Market
3.1 Global Cyberwarfare Market
3.2 US Share of the Global Cyberwarfare Market
3.3 Fastest-Growing National Cyberwarfare Markets

4. Leading National Cyberwarfare Markets
4.1 US Cyberwarfare Market
4.1.1 Quantifying Cyber Attacks on US Networks
4.1.2 US Cyber Command (CYBERCOM)
4.1.3 US Navy Fleet Cyber Command (FLTCYBERCOM)
4.1.4 US Air Force, 24th Air Force
4.1.5 US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
4.1.6 US Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
4.2 Chinese Cyberwarfare Market
4.2.1 Accusations of Chinese Involvement in Cyber Attacks
4.2.2 People's Liberation Army (PLA)
4.3 UK Cyberwarfare Market
4.3.1 Cyber Security Strategy
4.4 Russian Cyberwarfare Market
4.5 French Cyberwarfare Market
4.5.1 French Network and Information Security Agency (FNISA)
4.6 German Cyberwarfare Market
4.6.1 Falling Victim to GhostNet
4.6.2 Department of Information and Computer Network Operations
4.6.3 Federal Office for Information Security (BSI)
4.7 Japanese Cyberwarfare Market
4.7.1 National Information Security Center (NISC)
4.8 Indian Cyberwarfare Market
4.8.1 Attacks on Government Computers
4.9 Italian Cyberwarfare Market
4.10 South Korean Cyberwarfare Market
4.10.1 Cyberwarfare Command
4.10.2 Korea Internet & Security Agency (KISA)
4.11 Australian Cyberwarfare Market
4.11.1 Cyber Security Strategy
4.11.2 CERT Australia
4.11.3 Cyber Security Operations Centre (CSOC)
4.12 Canadian Cyberwarfare Market
4.12.1 Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre (CCIRC)
4.12.2 Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC)
4.13 Rest of the World Cyberwarfare Market

5. SWOT Analysis of the Cyberwarfare Market
5.1 Strengths
5.1.1 Increasing Demand for Cyber-Security Products
5.1.2 Growing Threat of Cyber Attacks
5.1.3 Better Awareness of Consequences
5.1.4 Rapid Technological Development
5.2 Weaknesses
5.2.1 Delays in Developing National Cyber Strategies
5.2.2 Complacent Attitudes to Information Security
5.2.3 Perceptions of Exaggerated Cyber Threats
5.2.4 Global Economic Outlook
5.3 Opportunities
5.3.1 Growth in Government Cyber Budgets
5.3.2 Changing Threats Drive Innovation
5.3.3 Accelerating Adoption of Cyber-Security Products
5.3.4 Software Companies Offering Commercial Products
5.4 Threats
5.4.1 Using Commercial Products to Meet Government Needs
5.4.2 Limited Budgets in Less-Developed Countries
5.4.3 Difficulties Establishing Cyber Agencies
5.4.4 Delaying Uptake While Products Mature

6. Expert Opinion
6.1 Spirent Communications: Daryl Cornelius, Director Enterprise EMEA
6.1.1 Generating Test Traffic
6.1.2 Governments Make Preparations for Threat Scenarios
6.1.3 Profiling Internet Traffic by Packet Analysis
6.1.4 Cyber Budget Boom in Europe and Asia
6.1.5 Holding Companies to Ransom
6.1.6 Commercial Exploitation of Cyberwarfare Tools and Data
6.1.7 Growth in Devices to Mask Identity
6.2 Co-operative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence: Eneken Tikk, Head of Legal Task Team
6.2.1 NATO Specialists in Cyber Security
6.2.2 Broad View of Cyberwarfare
6.2.3 Estonian Cyber Attacks Not Legally Warfare
6.2.4 Legal Problems Harder Than Technical Challenges
6.2.5 Cybercrime Convention Informs Policy Framework
6.3 F-Secure Corporation: Mikko Hypponen, Chief Research Officer
6.3.1 Offering Cyber Security as a Service
6.3.2 Leading Non-NATO Security Vendor
6.3.3 Most Important Cyber Markets
6.3.4 Cyberspace Reflects Real-World Crises
6.3.5 Preparations to Defend Against Countrywide Attack
6.3.6 Configuring Internet Exchanges
6.3.7 Traffic Shapers Help Block Denial-of-Service Attacks
6.3.8 After Cyber Espionage Comes Cyberwarfare
6.4 Science Applications International Corporation: Robert Giesler, Vice-President for Cyber Programs
6.4.1 Significant Investment in Cyber Capabilities
6.4.2 Growth in Government and Commercial Markets
6.4.3 Wide Range of Cyber Solutions
6.4.4 Insider Threat Analysis
6.4.5 Legal and Political Challenges
6.4.6 Continued Growth in US Government Cyber Spending
6.5 McAfee Inc: Greg Day, EMEA Security Analyst
6.5.1 Defining Cyberwarfare
6.5.2 Cyberwarfare Tools Available Online
6.5.3 Governments Develop Offensive and Defensive Measures
6.5.4 Defending Against Unknown Threats
6.5.5 Ease, Deniability and Acceptability Increase Likelihood of Attacks
6.6 Kaspersky Lab: Eugene Kaspersky, Chief Executive Officer
6.6.1 Fresh Focus on Enterprise Products
6.6.2 Encouraging Better Online Behaviour
6.6.3 Growth Opportunities in Emerging Markets
6.6.4 Botnets Pose Major Threat to Global Economy
6.6.5 Russian-Speaking Cybercriminals
6.7 Boeing Integrated Defense Systems: Barbara Fast, Vice-President of Boeing Cyber and Information Solutions
6.7.1 Deep Defences for Mission Success
6.7.2 Evolving Threats Mean Endless Opportunities
6.7.3 Integrated Cyber Responses
6.7.4 Operations Must Continue Despite Threat

7. Leading Cyberwarfare Companies
7.1 BAE Systems
7.2 Boeing Integrated Defense Systems (IDS)
7.3 Booz Allen Hamilton Inc
7.4 F-Secure Corporation
7.5 General Dynamics Corporation
7.6 GreyLogic
7.7 Kaspersky Lab
7.8 Lockheed Martin Corporation
7.9 ManTech International Corporation
7.10 McAfee Inc
7.11 Microsoft Corporation
7.12 NetWitness Corporation
7.13 Northrop Grumman Corporation
7.14 PGP Corporation
7.15 QinetiQ Group Plc
7.16 Raytheon Company
7.17 Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)
7.18 Spirent Communications
7.19 Symantec Corporation
7.20 Thales Group

8. Conclusions
8.1 Global Demand in the Cyberwarfare Market
8.2 Drivers of Growth in the Cyberwarfare Market
8.3 Restraints on Growth in the Cyberwarfare Market
8.4 The Future of the Cyberwarfare Market

9. Glossary

List of Tables and Figures
Table 3.1 Global Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 3.2 Global Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 3.3 National Cyberwarfare Sales Forecasts, 2010-2020
Table 3.4 National Cyberwarfare Market Share, 2009 vs. 2020
Table 3.5 US vs. Non-US Cyberwarfare Sales Forecasts, 2010-2020
Table 3.6 US vs. Non-US Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 3.7 Fastest-Growing National Cyberwarfare Markets, 2010-2020
Table 4.1 US Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.2 US Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 4.3 US DoD Reports of Malicious Cyber Activity, 2000-2009
Table 4.4 US-CERT Reports of Cyber Incidents, FY06-FY08
Table 4.5 Chinese Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.6 Chinese Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 4.7 UK Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.8 UK Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 4.9 Russian Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.10 Russian Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 4.11 French Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.12 French Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 4.13 German Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.14 German Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 4.15 Japanese Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.16 Japanese Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 4.17 Indian Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.18 Indian Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 4.19 Italian Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.20 Italian Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 4.21 South Korean Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.22 South Korean Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 4.23 Australian Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.24 Australian Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 4.25 Canadian Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.26 Canadian Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 4.27 Rest of the World Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Table 4.28 Rest of the World Cyberwarfare Sales CAGR, 2010-2020
Table 5.1 SWOT Analysis of the Cyberwarfare Market, 2010-2020

Figure 3.1 Global Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 3.2 National Cyberwarfare Market Share, 2009
Figure 3.3 National Cyberwarfare Market Share, 2020
Figure 3.4 US vs. Non-US Cyberwarfare Sales Forecasts, 2010-2020
Figure 3.5 US vs. Non-US Cyberwarfare Market Share, 2009 vs. 2020
Figure 3.6 Fastest-Growing National Cyberwarfare Markets, 2010-2020
Figure 4.1 US Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 4.2 US DoD Reports of Malicious Cyber Activity, 2000-2009
Figure 4.3 US-CERT Reports of Cyber Incidents, FY06-FY08
Figure 4.4 Chinese Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 4.5 UK Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 4.6 Russian Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 4.7 French Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 4.8 German Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 4.9 Japanese Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 4.10 Indian Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 4.11 Italian Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 4.12 South Korean Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 4.13 Australian Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 4.14 Canadian Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020
Figure 4.15 Rest of the World Cyberwarfare Sales Forecast, 2010-2020 

Companies Listed

Anagran Inc
APC
Atlan Inc
BAE Systems
BAE Systems Information Solutions
Barber Networks LLC
BCMC
Boeing Integrated Defense Systems (IDS)
Boeing Intelligence and Security Systems
Boeing Intelligence and Security Systems, Cyber and Information Solutions
Booz Allen Hamilton Inc
CA Inc
Check Point Software Technologies Ltd
Cisco Systems Inc
Cyveillance Inc
Dell Inc
Detica Ltd
EMC Corporation
EMC Corporation, RSA
Eye Street Software Corporation
Federated Software Group Inc
F-Secure Corporation
General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems
General Dynamics Corporation
Good Harbor Consulting LLC
Google Inc
GreyLogic
Hewlett-Packard (HP)
Intel Corporation
JB Management Inc
Juniper Networks Inc
Kaspersky Lab
LGS Innovations LLC
Lockheed Martin Corporation
Lockheed Martin Corporation, Advanced Technology Laboratories
Lockheed Martin Information Systems & Global Services
Lockheed Martin Simulation, Training & Support
ManTech International Corporation
McAfee Inc
Microsoft Corporation
NetApp
NetWitness Corporation
Nokia Corporation
Northrop Grumman Corporation
Northrop Grumman Information Systems
Panda Security
PGP Corporation
Poste Italiane
QinetiQ Group Plc
QinetiQ North America
QinetiQ North America, Mission Solutions Group
Quantum Research International Inc
Raytheon Company
Raytheon Company, Cybersecurity Solutions
Schneider Electric
Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)
Sophos Plc
Spirent Communications
Symantec Corporation
Tapestry Solutions Inc
Thales Group
Thales Information Systems Security
Trend Micro Inc
Tulip Systems Inc
VMware Inc

Government Agencies and Organisations Mentioned in This Report
Australian Defence Force (ADF)
Australian Defence Science and Technology Organisation (DSTO)
Australian Defence Signals Directorate (DSD)
Australian Defence Signals Directorate (DSD), Cyber Security Operations Centre (CSOC)
Australian Department of Defence (DoD)
British Army
Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre (CCIRC)
Canadian Department of National Defence (DND)
Canadian Government Operations Centre (GOC)
Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS)
CERT Australia
Chinese Ministry of Defence (MoD)
Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA)
Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA), General Staff Department
Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA), General Staff Department, Third Department
Chinese People's Liberation Army (PLA), General Staff Department, Fourth Department
Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC)
Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC), IT Security
Computer Emergency Response Team of Estonia (CERT Estonia)
Council of Europe
Estonian Informatics Centre
European Electronic Crime Task Force
European Union (EU)
Finnish Army
French Air Force
French Network and Information Security Agency (FNISA)
French Secretariat-General for National Defence (SGDN)
French Secretariat-General for National Defence (SGDN), Central Directorate for Information System Security (DCSSI)
German Bundeswehr
German Bundeswehr, Strategic Reconnaissance Command
German Bundeswehr, Department of Information and Computer Network Operations
German Chancellery
German Federal Office for Information Security (BSI)
German Federal Office for the Protection of the Constitution (BfV)
Helsinki Stock Exchange
Indian Army
Indian Army Cyber Security Establishment (ACSE)
Indian Cabinet Secretariat
Indian Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT-In)
Indian Ministry of Communications & Information Technology
Indian Ministry of Communications & Information Technology, Department of Information Technology
Indian Ministry of External Affairs (MEA)
Indian National Informatics Centre (NIC)
Information Warfare Monitor (IWM)
International Multilateral Partnership Against Cyber Threats (IMPACT)
Japanese National Information Security Center (NISC)
Japanese National Information Security Policy Council
Japan Ministry of Defense (MoD)
Japan Self-Defense Forces
Korea Information Security Agency
Korea Internet & Security Agency (KISA)
Korea IT International Co-operation Agency
National Internet Development Agency of Korea
New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Co-operative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence (CCD COE)
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Incident Management Section
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Military Committee
Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE)
Public Safety Canada
Republic of Korea Air Force
Republic of Korea Army
Republic of Korea Navy
Russian Federal Security Service (FSB)
Russian Ministry of Interior
Russian Ministry of Interior, Bureau of Special Technical Operations
SecDev Group
South Korean Defense Security Command (DSC)
South Korean Ministry of National Defense (MND)
South Korean National Intelligence Service (NIS)
South Korean/US Combined Forces Command (CFC)
Stanford University
Tokyo Stock Exchange
UK Cabinet Office
UK Cabinet Office, Office of Cyber Security (OCS)
UK Defence INFOSEC Product Co-operation Group (DIPCOG)
UK Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ)
UK Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), Cyber Security Operations Centre (CSOC)
UK Ministry of Defence (MoD)
UK Prime Minister's Office
UK Royal Air Force (RAF)
UK Royal Navy (RN)
University of Queensland
University of Queensland, AusCERT
University of Toronto
University of Toronto, Munk Centre for International Studies
US Air Force (USAF)
US Air Force (USAF), 24th Air Force
US Air Force (USAF), 67th Network Warfare Wing (NWW)
US Air Force Research Laboratory
US Air Force Space Command (AFSPC)
US Army
US Army 1st Information Operations Command (Land)
US Army Intelligence and Security Command
US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
US-China Economic and Security Review Commission
US Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT)
US Cyber Command (CYBERCOM)
US Cyber Consequences Unit
US Cyber Security Research and Development Center
US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Strategic Technology Office (STO)
US Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA)
US Department of Defense (DoD)
US Department of Defense (DoD), Cyber Crime Center
US Department of Defense (DoD), Defense Industrial Base (DIB) Cyber Security Task Force
US Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
US Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Cybersecurity Division (NCSD)
US Department of Homeland Security (DHS), National Protection and Programs Directorate
US Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C)
US Department of State
US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
US Fleet Cyber Command (FLTCYBERCOM)/10th Fleet
US Government Accountability Office (GAO)
US Joint Functional Component Command-Network Warfare (JFCC-NW)
US Joint Task Force-Global Network Operations (JTF-GNO)
US National Cyber Response Co-ordination Group (NCRCG)
US National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC)
US National Security Agency (NSA)
US Navy (USN)
US Office of Management and Budget (OMB)
US Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (OPNAV)
US Senate
US Strategic Command (STRATCOM)
US White House
World Health Organization (WHO) 

 

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